Category Archives: LinkedIn

How many Lisas do you know

I originally wrote “How Many Mikes do you know.”

Here is what I discovered about the women in my LinkedIn Network.

Out of now 3890 people, here is a list of the women’s names that showed up 10 or more times each.

First Name Count
Lisa 41
Mary 29
Susan 26
Jennifer 22
Karen 21
Julie 20
Linda 19
Robin 19
Donna 18
Ashley 17
Amy 16
Ann 16
Kimberly 16
Lori 16
Stephanie 16
Angela 15
Barbara 14
Deborah 14
Amanda 13
Beth 13
Kim 12
Laura 12
Melissa 12
Tracy 12
Denise 11
Elizabeth 11
Heather 11
Kathryn 11
Pam 11
Sharon 11
Tammy 11
Teresa 11
Brenda 10
Cheryl 10
Debbie 10
Katherine 10
Michelle 10
Rachel 10
Sarah 10

Each of these individuals are unique in their own right, even though, not in name.

I hope you enjoyed this little un-scientific research.

Teddy

Social Media Privacy – NOT

I have no concern for or expectation of Social Media privacy.

Why:

Because Social Media sites are intended to be Social and IMHO intended to share publicly consumable content.

Being social includes engaging and sharing with others.

When you engage with others hopefully you would never stand naked in public, spouting foul words and doing nasty, disgusting things. Similarly, when you engage with others in Social Media, you should never post anything that you would not say in public.

Also, you would never stand on a street corner and hand out a list of your business and  private, confidential information. Therefore, don’t post any confidential or private information on any social media site.

Therefore, take the concept and expectation of privacy, security or confidentiality out of every conversation regarding Social Media.

We need to consider Social Media as public content sites and that we are all contributors. Our role is to provide relevant, interesting and useful information for others to consume.

Additionally, yes, I know that there are many security and privacy features built into Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, WordPress, etc. These features provide some level of general security that can prohibit users from hacking our accounts and in some cases seeing our content. However beyond getting my account hacked, I do not want or need to trust the other security features.

I want my content to be accessible by anyone who desires to come looking for it.

Because I treat these systems as public sites and because I want to publicly contribute and collaborate with others. There is no need for anyone to ask for my Facebook password. All of my content is publicly accessible. Every post, picture, comment, tweet, discussion, connection, friend and fan are public content. Pure & simple to me.

Just to be clear, I expect my bank, financial institutions, credit cards, email messages, voice mail messages, private conversations and even thoughts to be private and confidential. If these systems get compromised in any way I will not be happy.

In conclusion I suggest you accept that there is no privacy using Social Media, just as there is no privacy standing on a street corner.

It’s more enjoyable, rewarding, engaging and beneficial if you set yourself free to share openly with no expectations of privacy.

What kind of a Freak are you?

I heard a friend talk about being a Temporary Freak today. He was referencing his activity on LinkedIn.

This got me to thinking – What kind of a Freak am I?

First of all, a Freak is not a bad thing.  My definition of Freak is “A very unusual and unexpected individual.”

In most of what I do, I am a Freak.

I live life in an unusual manner.

My business is as unusual as you can imagine.

I participate in Social Media quite unusual or differently than most

My Network style (Networking for Mutual Benefit) is very unexpectedly to others.

I share who I am as a person with just about anyone willing to take a peek at me and what I do, and for most, this is very unexpected.

And for me, I am not a Temporary Freak.

We joked that in regards to being a Freak you could be:

Contracted, Temporary, Part Time, Retired, Semi, Complete. Partial, Accidental, SubConscious, Comatose and/or Full Time.

In regards to Participating in Life and Social Media, I feel that I am a Full Time nearly Complete Freak.

I try hard to be consistent and honest in these areas, despite the fact that many feel I am unusual and unexpected.

What kind of a Freak are you in Life?

He pulls up his Pants like the rest of us

Every day he awakens and drags himself out of the bed. He heads into the bathroom and fires up the shower as one of the many steps of his morning ritual.

He shaves, brushes his hair and his teeth and considers whether or not his ear hairs need trimming.  This morning he opts to leave them alone. He pulls his suit pants and a bright white shirt off their hangers.

He heads out of the bedroom gives his wife and kids a kiss good bye and heads off to the garage with his coffee, car keys and backpack.

Off to work he goes, just like hundreds of thousands of us in North Carolina every day.

Does any of this sound unusual? Not really.  In some way or another we all do nearly the same thing every morning. We all put our pants on the same way.

Yet, many of us forget this once we get to work. I too used to suffer from the disease I call C-Phobia or Exec-Paranoia.

This is the not so uncommon fear of calling on the CEOs, CFOs, Executive VPs, Division Managers, CIOs and many other influential business men (& women). Lots of people would rather go to the dentist and get a root canal done.

These diseases stem from the inappropriate statements we here every day. Stuff like:

“He’s the big man, don’t bother him”
“You’re a peon and are not supposed to talk to Mr Big Britches. Better not knock on his door or call him.”
“He is far too busy to talk to you”
Etc.

Add your own statement here – Why did you fear calling on these people?

For the most part, these statements are not true. I don’t want to mis lead you. There are a lot of Mr Big Britches out there who for no real reason think they are better than the rest of us. This is unfortunate and shameful.

Most men (& women) put their pants on the same way the rest of us do.

Yeah, they have a important job and maybe a fancy-dan title, but they are people like the rest of us and their needs are very similar to the rest of us:

  • They want to have open and honest conversations about business & life
  • They don’t want to be sold or taken advantage of
  • They don’t want to be told what their problems are, they want to figure it out themselves (likely with help when they ask for it)
  • They want to discover good solutions to their personal and business problems
  • They want access to people with ideas who can improve their business, team, revenue and families
  • They want to know good people who they could consider adding to their team
  • They want business ideas and opportunities that can create value for their organizations and clients
  • They want to know what is going on around town, state & world that can have a positive (or negative) effect on their business & life
  • They want to capture knowledge that can help their team and business.
  • They event want to hear a good joke (at the appropriate time)
  • They want the same things the rest of us want

Knowing that these folks are busy and that they have the same needs as everyone else in business, how do we get over our C-Phobia or Exec-Paranoia?

  • Keep the points above in mind when we call, email or walk up to these good people.
  • Don’t waste their time trying to sell them. Spend time getting to know them and what is really important to them.
  • Be respectful, honest, transparent and willing to help them where we can and they want help. When we help a C-Level executive he will want to help us in return.

They put their pants just like the rest of us. They’re busy and have hectic lives but still need the same stuff we do.

What else do you need to know in order to call or walk up to him (or her) and say, “Hello”?

Does this help – picture his bare white legs and black socks. Can you see him pulling his suit pants up, tucking in his shirt and putting on his belt?  He puts his pants on the same way the rest of us do. Really.

 

Thanks to Nick D for reminding me of this point today.